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Death Vally in US Recorded the Highest 'Temperature on Earth'; Extreme Heat Warning in Western Third Countries

 The temperature in Death Valley hit 130 degrees at 3:41 p.m. Pacific time on Sunday, according to the National Weather Service. If verified, the reading would break Death Valley's previous August record by three degrees, the National Weather Service (NWS) tweeted.

NWS also warned about 56 million people are under heat advisories since the extreme heat will continue through the middle of week in Western third countries.

Death Valley holds the record for the hottest temperature ever recorded on Earth, which is 134 degrees. This record was set on July 10, 1913. However, that measurement is questionable; an extensive analysis of that record conducted in 2016 by Christopher Burt, an expert on extreme weather data, concluded that it was "essentially not possible from a meteorological perspective."

It'll be just as hot on Monday in Death Valley with a predicted high of 129 degrees, per the NWS. The agency is warning people who live in eastern California, Nevada, Arizona and Utah to limit their time outside to between 5 a.m. and 8 a.m.

 The heat is the result of high pressure that's settled over much of the West Coast.

Usually, the West and southwestern US experience the North American monsoon during this time of year, said Daniel Berc, warning coordination meteorologist for the National Weather Service in Las Vegas.

But the monsoon hasn't developed as it typically does so instead of heavy rainfall Death Valley is getting hotter under high pressure, Berc told.

"Everything I've seen so far indicates that is a legitimate observation," Randy Cerveny, who leads the World Meteorological Organization's weather and climate extremes team, wrote in an email. "I am recommending that the World Meteorological Organization preliminarily accept the observation. In the upcoming weeks, we will, of course, be examining it in detail, along with the U.S. National Climate Extremes Committee, using one of our international evaluation teams."

Death Valley is the lowest, driest and hottest location in the United States. Furnace Creek, where its temperature is measured, sits at 190 feet below sea level in the Mojave Desert of southeastern California. It is notorious for its blistering heat. In July 2018, its average temperature of 108.1 degrees represented the hottest month ever measured on the planet. During that month, it hit at least 120 degrees on 21 days.

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